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Sunday, May 21, 2017

Appreciating the value of your new platform

Building a new platform as a software engineer is easy. Right?
No, it is not, but it is definitely a lot of fun.
In my 19–20 year career, I have seen one common pattern. When someone (not every new employee) new starts working in your company, they occasionally tend to find ways to complain about the existing platform, and some even go as far as claiming that they can build a new platform in three months. Just to put it in perspective, I am talking about platforms that took many months to build and years to fine-tune; I am talking about the platforms that successful companies are based on and what brings salaries to their employees. I have also seen people fail in these claims trying to be heroes. Trying to be a hero while not understanding the magnitude of the situation is not productive. Your enthusiasm and energy needs to be channeled in a different way. It is ok to be optimistic and it is ok to be a participant in a healthy disruption, but I think the key to success is to be an optimistic realist. Keep it real, and lively by channeling your enthusiasm.
I am getting to the following point.
To successfully build and to truly truly appreciate the simplicity and value of the new platform, you had to experience the old platform in your company, live it, feel it, understand the pros and cons of the old platform, and capitalize on the pros and solve the cons; otherwise, you don’t have a way of measuring and comparing. How do you know that your new platform is better. It could be better, but is it better enough to justify the investment?
So if you are now starting a new job or you are a relatively new software engineer in your current company, please take time to understand the current platform before starting to recommend designs for a new platform. The team will value your opinion much more and you will get your opportunity to apply some healthy disruption.
Thank you for reading.
Almir Mustafic.


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